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The Most Beautiful, Affordable Holiday Homes Restored and Repaired by the Landmark Trust

The Most Beautiful, Affordable Holiday Homes Restored and Repaired by the Landmark Trust

Conservation and repair are at the heart of the Landmark Trust’s mission, and this extends way beyond their role as revivers of heritage and care of the natural environment. Many of the traditional methods and materials the Landmark Trust use are in themselves inherently more sustainable than their modern equivalents – they set out to conserve what is already there wherever possible.

Their award-winning project at the once-decaying Llwyn Celyn in Wales involved mending its 85-tonne stone roof using a mixture of reclaimed tiles and others newly quarried just a few miles away. It should last at least 100 years, and maybe three times that long. This work at Llwyn Celyn has rescued one of Wales’ most important historic buildings for generations to come.

The Landmark Trust Llwyn Celyn, Wales before restoration

The Landmark Trust Llwyn Celyn, Wales after restoration

Landmark’s approach has always been to restore and repair using materials and techniques appropriate to the original construction of the building. They depend on traditional craft skills and their practitioners, and in doing so forge a reciprocal relationship: benefiting hugely from the skills of such craftspeople as thatchers, stonemasons, plasterers, carpenters, joiners and decorators. In turn, their projects help keep these precious skills alive.

At Cobham Dairy in Kent, Landmark’s latest project, Master Plasterer Philip Gaches has recreated detailed ribbed vaulting and hand-modelled corbels. Before the restoration work was underway, the plasterwork was crumbling away, and the building had been abandoned, its walls defaced with graffiti. Philip has restored the dairy’s delicate ceiling using historical techniques and following the architect’s original drawings dating to 1794. Working alongside have been Anna Castilla Villa, who started with Philip as a Prince’s Foundation apprentice, and his sons, therefore passing this traditional skill to a new generation.

Clavell Tower, which stands proud on a cliff at Kimmeridge Bay in Dorset, was a victim of coastal erosion until Landmark stepped in. Over centuries the tower has inspired writers including Thomas Hardy and P.D, James. Back in 2002, it stood empty and derelict - it was dangerously close to slipping away forever. So acute is Landmark’s will to save remarkable places, that they disassembled the tower before rebuilding it further back from the cliff edge. Each brick had to be numbered and stored in crates, before being rebuilt, using the help of technical photography and planning. They left the old foundations to record where the original tower stood.

The Landmark Trust Clavell Tower, Dorset before restoration

The Landmark Trust Clavell Tower, Dorset after restoration

Dolbelydr, set in rolling meadows in Denbighshire in Wales, was the home of a Tudor gentleman called Henry Salesbury and is thought to be the birthplace of the Welsh language. When Landmark acquired the building, it had no roof or floor, but it did have a tree growing through the middle of it. They wholeheartedly believed in the building’s significance and its future as an uplifting self-catering property. The 16th-century roof frame was taken away, reassembled off-site by specialist carpenters and craned back into position.

The Landmark Trust Clavell Tower, Wales before restoration

The Landmark Trust Clavell Tower, Wales after restoration

Our latest 1485 collection in association with The Landmark Trust takes into consideration these fundamental principles. These beautiful fabrics are designed and woven in Lancashire and draw inspiration from unique and exciting examples within The Landmark Trust's portfolio of around 200 buildings.

With every purchase from this collection, we will be contributing to this fantastic conservation charity to ensure that their hugely important work can forge ahead and that the public can continue to enjoy holidays in extraordinary places.

To find out more about The Landmark Trust or book a ‘holiday in history’ visit www.landmarktrust.org.uk.

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